Death: Not What It Seems

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Finish Line: Overnight Suicide Prevention Walk San Diego 2017

After today’s meditation in our Blue Sky Zen Morning Service, I’m convinced that Death, once the “dust” and the emotional reaction to dying, settles, feels like meditation.

That to be dead is to be pure awareness, consciousness so vast that it perceives itself.

It hears the birds, and the neighbors walking by, and those sounds are oneself. It sees bugs crawling on the flowers on the altar, and it is the bug and the flower too, which now fills the awareness for love, in love with its own beingness.

There is no need for embodiment, for movement is in the awareness, and it is everywhere. Embodiment into form is actually a type of prison, and formalization, a containment into individuality, that which is not individual in its fullest form.

I’m afraid of the pain of dying, the loss of my attachments and loves, but truly, nothing is ever lost. All of our dead beloveds are right here, in the space between our atoms, our cells, the molecules that individuate us, and all the space in between.

Death is a grieving of a loss of companionship in individuated form. But that person is still here, still integrated into the vastness of consciousness.

I had a dream once that I was in a car that plunged off a cliff.   I was in the passenger seat, terrified as we crashed and died. But the dream didn’t end there. Then, I was dead, but it was hilarious. All I could do was laugh, because my fear had been so ridiculous, for everything was already the same. Just no particular body.

It might take some time for this insight to be integrated into daily consciousness, but it’s a relief, and it’s a biggie.

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Telepathy & The True Nature Of Reality

Consciousness

The reason that science hasn’t been able to test telepathy is because they’re looking for the wrong thing. Telepathy isn’t about transmitting messages. In telepathy, there isn’t technically a sender and a receiver. This is because telepathy exists outside of time, in that non-local soup where all our consciousnesses connect.

The Japanese concept of Ishin- is closer to what telepathy actually is than a transmission of messages. It means ‘unspoken mutual understanding’, and is often translated as ‘heart to heart communication.’ In Zen, it means ‘direct mind transmission’, and it is indeed through Zen that this concept found its way into Japanese culture, via China, from India, where Ishin-denshin referred to the first Dharma transmission between Gautama Buddha and Mahākāśyapa in the Flower Sermon.